August 7, 2011


Last night, Melissa and I made an exciting discovery while a little less than clinically sober when I found this photo—
The black pupil of the eye, which we previously thought to be there, actually isn’t.
I mean…look at this photo and think for a little bit and tell me that it ain’t so.
Instead, it leads back into your eye to create the nerves that connect your eyeball to your brain. 
Our iris, raised around it, is actually what expands and contracts (much like a camera lens zooming in or out and focusing), and is what we see when we think our pupil is “dilating.” 
This means…all the raised “ropes” and filaments of pigment in the iris that you see in the photo above are made like incredibly tiny, tiny mirrors that take in EVERYTHING we see around us, and send it back to our brain. Kind of like how a fly has the disco-ball eyeball.
An entire section of the eye I thought was there and tangible. Gone. …Now would probably be a good time to say that we haven’t fact-checked our hypothesis yet, considering the fact that right after we gabbed about this to each other like startled monkeys on crack cocaine for about half an hour, I promptly decided it was time to go night-night. And by “promptly decided it was time to go night-night,” I mean I just fell the fuck asleep. But I’d like to think that I’m about 78% sure that we’re correct. Even while holding a beer instead of an anatomy textbook.
MIND. BLOWN.
XOXO

Last night, Melissa and I made an exciting discovery while a little less than clinically sober when I found this photo—

The black pupil of the eye, which we previously thought to be there, actually isn’t.

I mean…look at this photo and think for a little bit and tell me that it ain’t so.

Instead, it leads back into your eye to create the nerves that connect your eyeball to your brain. 

Our iris, raised around it, is actually what expands and contracts (much like a camera lens zooming in or out and focusing), and is what we see when we think our pupil is “dilating.” 

This means…all the raised “ropes” and filaments of pigment in the iris that you see in the photo above are made like incredibly tiny, tiny mirrors that take in EVERYTHING we see around us, and send it back to our brain. Kind of like how a fly has the disco-ball eyeball.

An entire section of the eye I thought was there and tangible. Gone. …Now would probably be a good time to say that we haven’t fact-checked our hypothesis yet, considering the fact that right after we gabbed about this to each other like startled monkeys on crack cocaine for about half an hour, I promptly decided it was time to go night-night. And by “promptly decided it was time to go night-night,” I mean I just fell the fuck asleep. But I’d like to think that I’m about 78% sure that we’re correct. Even while holding a beer instead of an anatomy textbook.

MIND. BLOWN.

XOXO

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Ha. HA. HA!!! SEEEEEE?!!!!!!! (Also…bad pun.)
NOTHING SOLID in the black part of the pupil between your iris. Instead, hole into the bowl of your lens.BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA DISCOVERIES! 
XOXO

Ha. HA. HA!!! SEEEEEE?!!!!!!! (Also…bad pun.)

NOTHING SOLID in the black part of the pupil between your iris. Instead, hole into the bowl of your lens.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA DISCOVERIES! 

XOXO

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I am one of the deepest motherfuckers I know.

XOXO

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